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Notasteron lawlessi

Fact Box
Species:
Notasteron lawlessi
(The identification of the spider shown on this page is derived from the 2003 research paper published by Dr. B. Baehr as shown below)
Family:
Zodariidae
Body length:
female: 6 mm
male: 5 mm
Habitat:
Males of this species and may be found wandering at ground level during the mating season but the females normally remain in underground retreats
Toxicity:
Bites by this spider may cause brief local pain and inflammation at the bite site
Notasteron lawlessi
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Male, two views
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Male, front view
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Another view
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Other views
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Other views
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Male, two views
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Other views
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Other views

The identity of the spider was derived from the description given in the following paper: Baehr BC (2003) "The genetic relationship of the new endemic Australian ant spider genus Notasteron (Araneae, Zodariidae)" in Journal of Arachnology, 33, 445-455.

The general body and leg shapes and the eye arrangement are typical of a zodariid and the only differences from Dr. Baehr's description of Notasteron lawlessi are the sizes and colour of the of the pale dorsal abdominal patches (i.e. much larger and yellow rather than white) and the main colour of the body and legs. Dr. Baehr stated that this main colour is orange to brown whereas it is clear from the photos above that the body and legs are almost black. It is presumed the reason for this difference was that the spider was originally described from a preserved specimen which inevitably had lost much of its dark colour.

Two specimens are shown in the above images. One was collected at Plainland in the Lockyer Valley of South Queensland while the other was found in Central NSW, which confirms the wide range for this species as indicated in Dr. Baehr's paper.

Like many other zodariids this spider is an ant mimic and ants are undoubtedly its preferred prey.

Spiders with a very similar appearance: Some other zodariids, especially some Habronestes species and some members of the Asteron group of zodariids.


Email Ron Atkinson for more information.    Last updated 19 March 2017.